Review: Foundation and Empire

The clash against the Empire was inevitable. The Foundation was small but more advanced, while the Empire was massive as fuck. This conflict though, seem to me, only served as introduction to show the extent of Hari Seldon’s psychohistory; the people of the Foundation really put much faith in it. Such reliance on “scientific” prophecy made them arrogant and complacent. The Foundation grew too big and began to possess some traits of ugly bureaucracy they once opposed.

Bayta, a female character in the story said:

“It’s almost a century since the last one, and in that century, every vice of the Empire has been repeated in the Foundation. Inertia! Our ruling class knows one law: no change. Despotism! They know one rule: force. Maldistribution! They know one desire: to hold what is theirs.”

Then came the Mule. A terrifying opponent. He’s a mutant with an ability to affect emotions. This factor introduced an alien variable outside the psychohistory’s equation. When the holographic form of Hari Seldon re-appeared, the crises he described was different. Everyone shocked and panicked. They didn’t expect this. Their faith betrayed them. Soon after that, the Mule amassed tremendous power. World by world fell to his dominion. Allies turned and converted. The main characters fled here and there in desperation to avoid peril while also trying to find a solution. What’s the key to stop this powerful mutant? Even the great Hari Seldon didn’t foresee this.

This second book of the trilogy is more story based compared with the first book. Foundation and Empire has more focus on how people would struggle in what seemed like a comfortable predictable world against something alien, while the first book was more about how the Foundation survived by adapting its shape to the organic contraction of history. Of course I prefer the first book, but Foundation and Emperor is still a very interesting read and may or may not lay a solid basis for the next book I’ll read after this.

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